Ex-Minister Midzi’s Child Cries Foul

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HARARE-Late former Energy minister Amos Midzi’s daughter has poured out her heart, expressing frustration at the way her father’s death was handled and giving a glimpse into how children of Zimbabwe’s political elite live ‘privileged’ lives. midzi body

Vimbai, writing in her blog, says her father died in strange circumstances and shows unhappiness over the way the investigations into his death have been handled.

Midzi, who was Epworth MP and former Zanu PF Harare provincial chairman, was found dead in his car at a family farm near the capital on June9.

Police said he committed suicide but his family suspected foul play. According to reports police recovered a one litre bottle of methamidophos and sleeping tablets from Midzi’s vehicle.

Midzi was among a host of top Zanu PF officials who were fired from the party for allegedly supporting former Vice-President Joice Mujuru.

Vimbai’s blog post titled How I try to be mildly Zanu PF kid’has sparked debate on social media especially her take on her father’s death and the privileges enjoyed by children of the ruling elite.

“Hello, my name is Vimbai. I’m a Midzi. As far as I know, the police are investigating the ‘strange’ circumstances around my father’s death,” she wrote.

“I’m waiting patiently sort-of, and hoping that justice will be served.”

Vimbai said it had already taken long for the Midzi family to get justice after the politician’s death but she was resigned to the fact that’s how things worked in Zimbabwe.

“But I live in a country where justice is more likely to be your cousin’s name from Mberengwa than an actual democratic principle that should hold true for all citizens,” she wrote.

“But I have that stubborn Zimbabwean hope that I’ve cultivated over years of being told zvichanaka chete (it shall be well).”

She also writes about the good life as a child of a Zanu PF official and how they appear insulated from problems ordinary Zimbabweans.

“Being the child of someone who is part of a revolutionary party can have its perks,” Vimbai wrote.

“I got to live in different countries, I went to a good school and I spend most of my time in the diaspora now, like many other young privileged Zimbabweans I know.

“I live in a nice neighbourhood in Zim, I mostly have a car at my disposal and I could mingle with the glitterati of Harare on the weekends in expensive bars.”

Vimbai suggests there are many children of Zanu PF officials who are aware of the party’s shortcomings but were afraid to speak out.

“Nothing is more annoying than a Zanu kid who blindly chants slogans and never questions the motives behind policies, laws, certain presentations of historical narratives etc,” she added.

“Be critical enough to hear and understand all sides of the story before you jump up in support of daddy/mummy dearest.

“They won’t always believe in everything the party does, but they won’t always be in a position to counter it either.

“Know that they love you and they are most likely doing the best they can, but that they’re part of a machine that never sleeps and that thrives on absolute power. Power corrupts, and it’s addictive.”

She said her post was not inspired by accusations that her father supported Mujuru’s alleged plot to unseat President Robert Mugabe
“I do think that if we have the capacity to help/change something or someone, no matter who we are, we should,” Vimbai said.

“I also think I have the liberty to say this because of my father’s ‘mysterious death’ and investigations so don’t sweat it if you’re like me and you’d never write or say this in so many words.”

Vimbai yesterday refused to elaborate on her post saying speaking through this paper would further entrench her father’s memory “as one that should be forgotten as an outcast from Zanu.”

 

The Standard

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